Blackwood Gazette #131: Public Memorial For Actor Hostander Alleroy Turns into “A Chaotic Maelstrom of Heated Emotions…”

By Alex Grosset, Arts and Entertainment

29/5- A memorial for the late Hostander Alleroy, one of the most beloved stage actors of our time, descended into anarchy last night.

Everything started off as one would expect, with Francois Lupeau, head of the Oeil de Fleur Association of Theatrical Arts, took to the stage for a look back over Alleroy’s career. This was followed by the customary moment of silence. Lupeau then opened the stage for anyone who wanted speak of their time with Alleroy and what his work meant to them.
Poet Theodor Vorschevsky was the first to stand up, and regaled the audience with a remembrance of Alleroy through verse and music. It was rough in its execution, but touching in its sincerity. Things went downhill after that.

Actress Valencia Dupon followed. She spoke of her ill-fated romance with Alleroy in a monologue that went on for thirty minutes. The speech was broken into little vignettes, which she acted out. For the most part, those gathered in attendance listened with strained patience, often sighing or rolling their eyes. When she recounted the incident that ended their affair, the discovery of Alleroy’s relationship with actor Donolan Shea, she failed to take into account that Shea was in the audience. Shea, taking offense at Dupon’s interpretation of events, stormed the stage and confronted her verbally. Dupon lashed out at him, and before things could take a more violent turn, they were removed from the premises.

The most heinous act of disrespect, however, came in the form of actor Roman Karvander. Karvander recalled Alleroy as a deceitful man who once undercut him for the role of Lollis Bamberby Happenstance in Papeau’s masterpiece “Two Bits for the Plaguebearer”, a role that earned Alleroy his earliest acclaim. The accusations Karvander leveled at the deceased were the final straw, and sent Alleroy’s friends and loved ones into a frenzy. Unfortunately, Alleroy’s enemies were almost equal in number, and a ruckus broke out.

Fighting spilled into the streets. Horse carts were over turned and several businesses had boards over broken windows come this morning. Famed soprano Alicia Sols was seen in the middle of the street, rending her clothes and wailing Brahmmer’s “Winter’s Dirge” at the sky. Authorities were called in to restore the peace.

“The entire event was insane,” Alleroy’s son, Alexander, told me. “A chaotic maelstrom of heated emotions, grief and hate and love all coming together. Were he alive and in attendance, I’m sure Pops would have loved it.”

Blackwood Gazette #131: Public Memorial For Actor Hostander Alleroy Turns into “A Chaotic Maelstrom of Heated Emotions…”

Blackwood Gazette #125: Actor Hostander Alleroy Dies During Performance; Nobody Notices Until End of Show

By Alex Grosset, Arts and Entertainment

21/5- Fate has seen fit to deal the world of theatre a grievous blow, as storied actor (and personal friend) Hostander Alleroy suffered a failure of the heart last night during a performance of Delando’s ‘Fires of D’Kalm D’korr. He was 72 years of age.

Alleroy passed during the climax of the play, while giving the much lauded night time soliloquy. Unfortunately, since the soliloquy ends with the death of his character, the magister Echliender Brofskenbauer, and is immediately followed by a large battle that involves almost thirty actors on stage at once, no one noticed that Alleroy was dead until the final curtain call, when he did not get up and join the rest of the cast in a bow.

“Everyone was mortified,” said one member of the audience. “Absolutely mortified. I personally thought something might be wrong when Hostander hit the stage like a ton of bricks, but wrote it off as him simply giving the performance of a lifetime…which, well, I suppose he did. Oh, this is so horrible!”

Alleroy earned critical acclaim early in his career for his performance of Prince Coulette, in Wilhelm Shanksbaum’s classic play, Coulette. He became a fixture of Shanksbaumian theatrical troupes for the rest of his life. Commercial acclaim, however, eluded him until he took on the role of the magister in Delando’s high fantasy saga, ‘The Ichthylliad’ of which ‘Fires’ is the thirteenth entry.

“His casting was a godsend,” said Harol Bousey, the leader of Alleroy’s acting troupe. “Hostander just had a way of taking Delando’s nonsense and giving it weight. You might not have been able to understand any of it, but when Hostander spoke the lines, you damn well believed in it.”

Fans of Alleroy have taken to the streets outside the Empress theatre since this morning, holding a vigil for the actor. I plan to join them, once this story goes to press.

“Goodbyes are bittersweet things indeed, for though parting is painful, reunion is ever so uplifting.” –Wilhelm Shanksbaum, The Drake of Val Coursais.

Blackwood Gazette #125: Actor Hostander Alleroy Dies During Performance; Nobody Notices Until End of Show